Author Archives: apricerees

Whoop Whoop It’s Friday

Congratulations to our Stars of the Week. See who are our BugClub and Mathletics winners this week here and join our Whoop Whoop Zoom Assembly every Friday at 10.30am where we will be picking some of the fantastic work children have sent in to show everyone! Email year2@thomasbuxtonps.co.uk to get the link to the zoom.

P4C – Week beginning 29/06/20

Watch this video and answer the question:

Is it better to be a little bit happy all of the time or really happy just some of the time?

Consider these questions to help you think deeper:

Is it possible to be happy all the time? Is it possible to stop yourself from being sad? Is it OK to feel different emotions? Are there any benefits from feeling sad or feeling different emotions? Could you get bored of being a little bit happy all of the time?

Use the sentence openers to have a discussion with your families and type your answers in the comment section of this post.

  • In my opinion…
  • I agree with… because…
  • I disagree with… because
  • I would like to add…

Use the sentence starters below if you want to come up with your own philosophical question about something you have read or seen this week:

  • Should …?
  • Is it OK…?
  • What if…?
  • Is it possible…?
  • When is…?

Whoop Whoop It’s Friday!

Congratulations to our Stars of the Week. See who are our BugClub and Mathletics winners this week here and join our Whoop Whoop Zoom Assembly every Friday at 10.30am where we will be picking some of the fantastic work children have sent in to show everyone! Email year2@thomasbuxtonps.co.uk to get the link to the zoom.

Homework – Week beginning 22/06/20

Yesterday, Monday 22nd June, was Windrush Day. Find out more here and answer the P4C question with your family here.

Join us on Friday at 10.30am for our Whoop Whoop assembly. There is also a parents coffee morning at 11am on Friday where you can ask staff questions and chat to other parents. Email year2@thomasbuxtonps.co.uk for the log in details to these events.

Miss Price-Rees is still reading The BFG here!

Topic: Outdoor Learning

Last week you should have set up a plant experiment or planted some food scraps to see if they grow into a new plant. If you haven’t already done that, read instructions on how to do so here.

Regularly check up on your plants. Do they need watering? If one of your plants is starting to grow you can start your plant diary, including observational drawings, and start measuring your plant. You should do this at the same time each week. Instructions for your plant diary, a lesson on descriptive language and tips and a video on observational drawing can be found here.

This week we will also be looking at what being active means, why it is important and how we can enjoy being active in many different ways. Watch this video to find out why this is important.

Reading

Before you read think about these questions

  • What does ‘being active’ mean?
  • How do you feel when you are being active?
  • How do you feel after you have been active?
  • What activities you do count as exercise?

Now answer these questions:

  1. What happens to your heart when you exercise?
  2. What happens to your breathing when you exercise?
  3. What happens to your temperature when you exercise?
  4. How does exercise help your heart?
  5. What are some other benefits of exercising?
  6. Do you think it is important to be active? Why?
  7. How often should we exercise?
  • Name five activities that count as exercise?
  • How often should we exercise?

Writing

We should do at least 60 minutes (one hour) of exercise that makes us feel
warmer
, makes us breathe harder and makes
our heart beat faster every day.

Task 1: Create an exercise plan for the week to make sure
you do at least 60 minutes of exercise a day. You don’t have to do it all in
one go and on different days you could do different exercise. You will need to
use your knowledge of counting minutes to help you.

You could choose some of the 12 sports day challenges from
the Sport Whoop Whoop Assembly to do with your family, which can be found here,
or find other ideas for exercise on the Healthy Lives section of our blog.

Here is an example of one day:

Task 2: Keep an exercise diary. You will need to read the clock and record exactly what time you start and finish your exercise so you can work out how long it actually took you. Did you start on time? Did you take more or less time than you planned to? You will need to use your knowledge of telling the time and calculating minutes to do this.

Then reflect on how the exercise made you feel:

  • Does your body feel warmer?
  • Has your breathing changed? How?
  • Is your heart beating faster?
  • Has your mood changed?
  • Do you feel happier/energised/relaxed/calm/tired?
  • Did you enjoy the exercise?
  • Was it challenging enough?
  • Could you do it for longer next time?

It is important than we do exercise we enjoy doing. This activity will help you to identify what exercise you enjoy doing and if it is a good challenge for your body. Some of your muscles may ache a little the next day but that is OK. If you feel any pain stop the exercise immediately.

When writing your exercise diary you will need to use verbs to describe what you did. Here is a recap lesson on what verbs are on BBC Bitesize. Here is a lesson in identifying the 4 different types of sentences we can use in our writing. 

Spelling

In week 2 of summer term your spellings were on contractions. Here is a BBC Bitesize lesson to recap contractions. 

The /o/ sound spelt with ‘a’ after w and qu

  1. want
  2. watch
  3. wander
  4. quantity
  5. squash
  6. quality
  7. squabble
  8. sqad
  9. quarrel
  10. quad

You can also download and print handwriting practice sheets for the Year 1 and Year 2 common exception words for free here.

Maths

This week we will continue to focus on time. Our aims are to be able to tell and write the time to 5 minute intervals, including quarter to/past and draw the hands on a clock face to show these times. We need to know the number of minutes in an hour and the number of hours in the day and be able to compare and sequence intervals of time.

Watch this short video again for an introduction to telling the time. Then complete the activities and quiz below the video. Can you complete it quicker this time and get more correct? This super movers song and dance and this song will also help you answer the questions below.

  1. How many minutes are there in an hour?
  2. How many hours are there in a day?
  3. The long hand is the ____________ ___________. (hour hand / minute hand)
  4. The short hand is the __________ ____________. (hour hand / minute hand)
  5. Each number on the clock shows a passing of how many minutes?

Task 1: Last week you read the time on an analogue clock and recorded what the time was. This week you need to draw the clocks below and add the hands to show the different times. You could use something round, like a lid, as a stencil to draw a perfect circle. Remember the hour hand must be shorter than the minute hand. 

Use this image to help you:

Task 2: Complete these activities to compare and sequence time.

It is also important that we revisit and continue to practice our calculation strategies. This week complete lessons 6-10 lessons of the topic ‘Exploring calculation strategies here on adding and subtracting 2-digit numbers with regrouping.

There are some fantastic videos here you can also use to support your understanding:

Complete the addition, subtraction and time reasoning and problem solving challenges set on Mathletics. 

Art

This week’s art lesson is to explore warm and cool colours and create an artwork inspired by Georgia O’Keeffe and nature.

PSHE

Our aim this week is to be able to recognise the cycles of life in nature, understand there are some changes outside of my control and recognise how I feel about this. 

This session is best done in discussion with an adult or the whole family. 

What changes can you see from this baby turning into an adult? 

Can you think of any other changes that have happened to you or will happen to you? Talk to an adult about how you feel about these changes. 

There are lots of changes that happen in our life to us, and around us, that we can’t control. One example is the seasons and weather. 

The changes that happen to our body are all part of our natural life cycle. 

Watch this video and think about what different changes you notice in the animals and plants. 

This video gives more detail about how humans change and grow. How does this video make you feel? 

Task: Research and draw and label

the life cycle of an animal, plant or human. Use these videos to help you:

The Life Cycle of Animals. 

The Life Cycle of a Plant.

 

Computing

Watch the 3 videos with Sam, Ellie and Alfie here and then play the game Band Runner to see how much you know about internet safety. 

Childline is yours – a free, private and confidential service where you can talk about anything.

Check out RaspberryPi’s weekly computing challenges here. They also have a live lesson every Wednesday at 2pm!

Hour of Code also have loads of coding activities here.

Parents and carers, for more about keeping your child safe online click here. Click here for a guide on how to create a family agreement to set expectations and boundaries about internet use at home.

RRS Article of the Week

How to contact us

We would love you to share with us what you are doing in the comments section of this blog post. You can also update your teacher on your progress by emailing year2@thomasbuxtonps.co.uk.

Happy learning everyone!

P4C – Week beginning 22/06/20

Monday 22nd June was Windrush Day. Watch this video to find out who the Windrush generation are and scroll down to listen to Floella Benjamin’s story ‘I fought every day.’

Can we know anything about a person just by looking at them?

Consider these questions to help you think deeper:

Why were people unfriendly to the Windrush Generation when they arrived in Britain? Why did Floella fight every day? Does someone’s appearance (the way they look; skin colour, hair, size, shape, clothing) tell us anything about their personality? Should we get to know someone before we judge them? Are all strangers dangerous? What can we learn from people who have lived in different countries?

Did someone in your family move from another country to the UK? If yes, ask them about their experience and see if it was the same or different to the people of the Windrush Generation. Why did they move country? What were their hopes? Were they surprised when they arrived? Did they face challenges? Find out more about the Windrush Generation here.

Use the sentence openers to have a discussion with your families and type your answers in the comment section of this post.

  • In my opinion…
  • I agree with… because…
  • I disagree with… because
  • I would like to add…

Use the sentence starters below if you want to come up with your own philosophical question about something you have read or seen this week:

  • Should …?
  • Is it OK…?
  • What if…?
  • Is it possible…?
  • When is…?

Whoop Whoop It’s Friday!

Congratulations to our Stars of the Week. See who are our BugClub and Mathletics winners this week here and join our Whoop Whoop Zoom Assembly every Friday at 10.30am where we will be picking some of the fantastic work children have sent in to show everyone! Email year2@thomasbuxtonps.co.uk to get the link to the zoom.

Homework – Week beginning 15/06/20

It is very important for us to exercise daily, especially at the moment when we are not walking to school daily or playing in the playground. Enjoy the 12 sports day challenges from last Friday’s Sport Whoop Whoop Assembly with your family here. This week’s topic is outdoor learning – how many of these challenges can you do outdoors?

Join us on Friday at 10.30am for our Whoop Whoop assembly. There is also a parents coffee morning at 11am on Friday where you can ask staff questions and chat to other parents. Email year2@thomasbuxtonps.co.uk for the log in details to these events.

Topic: Outdoor Learning

This week will we be learning about plants. We will begin to observe plants growing and changing and learn what plants need in order to grow well.

Complete this BBC Bitesize lesson to recap the basic parts of a plant. There are two videos and a quiz. Task: Draw a labelled diagram of a plant. If you have a plant at home you should draw that one!

  1. What do the roots of a plant do?
  2. What does the stem do?
  3. What do the leaves do?

What do plants need in order to grow?

There are a number of experiments we can do to find out what plants need to grow.

Option 1: Experiment ideas if you have 2 or more seeds that are exactly the same at home:

(Look here for ideas of how to make plant pots with things from your recycling bin.)

When you have chosen your experiment complete this record sheet.

When you have finished your experiment watch the two videos and quiz from BBC Bitesize below to confirm what plants need in order to grow.

Option 2: If you do not have seeds at home you can investigate if it is possible to grow food from food scraps at home! You will need to watch these two videos and quiz from BBC Bitesize to understand what plants need to grow first.

(Look here for ideas of how to make plant pots with things from your recycling bin.)

There are guides on how to grow 19 different foods from food scraps here! Why not try more than one vegetable?

Your writing and art task this week is to create a plant diary with observational sketches of your plant(s). You may want to write about the plants you are growing each day, every few days or once a week over the next month.

You will need to look really closely at the plant and use lots of adjectives to describe the changes in colour, shape, size and texture of the plant. Here is a BBC Bitesize lesson on descriptive language.

You will need to look closely at your plant to draw it accurately. Watch this video on how to draw a plant properly. And read these top tips:

If you don’t have any seeds or weren’t able to grow a plant from food scraps, write a plant diary for a plant that already exists in your home or go to your local park and choose a plant to sketch and write about and observe the changes each time you go back.

Practice your measuring skills that we recently revisited by measuring your plants in centimetres (cm) as they grow and recording their heights in a table.

Can you use your measurements to create a bar graph to show the change in height of your plant?

Find out more about plants with these learner guides and clips from BBC Bitesize here.

Here is a beginners guide for adults on how to grow vegetables with no pots, soil, seeds or space!

Reading

Spellings

The stressed /er/ spelt with ‘or after w and the sound /or/ spelt ‘ar’ after w

  1. word
  2. work
  3. worm
  4. world
  5. worth
  6. worst
  7. war
  8. warm
  9. towards
  10. ward

You can also download and print handwriting practice sheets for the Year 1 and Year 2 common exception words for free here.

Maths

For the next 2 weeks we will be focusing on time. Our aims are to be able to tell and write the time to 5 minute intervals, including quarter to/past and draw the hands on a clock face to show these times. We need to know the number of minutes in an hour and the number of hows in the day and be able to compare and sequence intervals of time.

Watch this short video for an introduction to telling the time. Then complete the activities and quiz below the video. This super movers song and dance and this song will also help you answer the questions below.

  1. How many minutes are there in an hour?
  2. How many hours are there in a day?
  3. The long hand is the ____________ ___________. (hour hand / minute hand)
  4. The short hand is the __________ ____________. (hour hand / minute hand)
  5. Each number on the clock shows a passing of how many minutes?

Task: Keep a diary every day for 5 days of what time you do the below activities. You must use an analogue clock (a round one with hands) so if you don’t have an analogue clock or watch at home use this one. Use the image of the clock below to help you.

  1. What time did you wake up?
  2. What time did you eat breakfast?
  3. What time did you eat lunch?
  4. What time did you eat dinner?
  5. What time did you go to sleep?

Do you do these activities at the same time every day? Did the timings change at the weekend?

Complete the time activities and challenges on Mathletics and p54-57 of your CGP Maths book.

It is also important that we revisit and continue to practice our calculation strategies. This week there are 5 lessons available here on addition, addition word problems and adding 2-digit numbers.

PSHE

Our aim for this session is to be able to express our appreciation for the people in our special relationships.

A compliment is something nice that you say to someone or a praise you give them. Let Elmo from Sesame Street show you some more examples here.

Think of a time when someone gave you a compliment. Who was it? How did it make you feel?

Some people get shy when someone gives them a compliment. Some people find it hard to accept or even believe a compliment that is given to them. It is important to be polite and say thank you and enjoy the nice feeling.

Why is it important to give compliments to people we have special relationships with? Why is it important not to say things that are unkind?

Task: Write a list of the people who you care about and love. Think of one compliment to give to each of these people. Make sure you give your compliment before next week!

Why not write your compliment in an origami heart? Learn how here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eRLDf6Ni4Tg

Computing

This week let’s recap what we have learnt so far about keeping safe online by completing this quiz

 Childline is yours – a free, private and confidential service where you can talk about anything.

Check out RaspberryPi’s weekly computing challenges here. They also have a live lesson every Wednesday at 2pm!

Hour of Code also have loads of coding activities here.

QUIZ ANSWERS: 1. d) 2. b) 3. d) 4. a), c), d) and e)

Parents and carers, for more about keeping your child safe online click here. Click here for a guide on how to create a family agreement to set expectations and boundaries about internet use at home.

RRS Article of the Week

Article 2- Non discrimination

What does the phrase ‘non-discrimination’ mean to you?

It is very important that:

  • We should treat everyone fairly.
  • All people should accept, respect and value others for who they are.
  • All schools should actively celebrate respect for all.
  • We should say something if we see someone being discriminated against.
  • Television shows, websites and newspapers should show all different types of people.

‘The flamingo who didn’t want to be pink?’

P4C Question – week beginning 15/06/20

For the last 2 weeks, you have been learning about a time in history beyond our living memory; the Victorian era. Watch this video and then answer this question.

Would it be better to go into the future or back into the past?

Consider these questions to help you think deeper:

Why is it important to learn about things that happened in the past? What could you gain from going back into the past for a day? How would you feel if you didn’t like what you saw in the past, or in the future? Can we know what will happen in the future? Should we predict what will happen in the future? What could we gain from going into the future?

Use the sentence openers to have a discussion with your families and type your answers in the comment section of this post.

  • In my opinion…
  • I agree with… because…
  • I disagree with… because
  • I would like to add…

Use the sentence starters below if you want to come up with your own philosophical question about something you have read or seen this week:

  • Should …?
  • Is it OK…?
  • What if…?
  • Is it possible…?
  • When is…?

Homework- Week Beginning 8/06/2020

Join us this afternoon (Tuesday 9th June) for our Year 2 Zoom Get-together at 2.30pm. This is a chance to see your friends and teachers, ask questions and have some fun together.

Join us on Friday at 10.30am for our Whoop Whoop assembly to celebrate Sports Day. The sports day challenges can be found here. There is also a parents coffee morning at 11am where you can ask questions.

Email year2@thomasbuxtonps.co.uk for the log in details to these events.

Looking for an energetic and uplifting way to start your day, wake yourself back up after lunch or release some tension and relax after work/study? Voice Foundation have been releasing a daily singing assembly every day of lock down with some of your favourite songs from school!

Please do continue to send us pictures of the work you do as we love to see all your hard work. Please do comment on the P4C blog post with your response so that your classmates can reply to your response and share their opinion too.

We hope you enjoy learning more about the Victorians this week and have fun writing a story – remember to spend lots of time planning, drafting and editing your story before writing a final draft.

The Victorians

The Victorian era started when Victoria became queen in 1837 and ended when she died in 1901. She was the longest serving queen until our current queen Elizabeth II!

The Victorian era was before we were born, before our parents were born and before our grandparents were born so it happened beyond our living memory.

During the Victorian era the British Empire still existed. Britain had taken control of many countries around the world and became very rich and powerful from selling things they found in these countries. The map below shows countries that were still part of the British Empire, including Australia, Canada, India and parts of Africa. Some of these countries still have a British flag as part of their own flags!

Because Britain had lots of money and because young people worked, instead of going to school, lots of inventions were made in the Victorian era. Listen to some of them here.

Below are some other important events that happened in the Victorian era:

  • 1837 Victoria became queen.
  • 1838 Slavery became illegal in Britain.
  • 1839 Photography was invented.
  • 1840s almost all towns and villages had a railway station
  • 1842 The Mine Act – children under 10 can no longer work in underground mines.
  • 1844 The Factory Act – children 8-13 can no longer work more than 6 and a half hours a day.
  • 1864 Children under 10 can no longer work as a chimney sweep.
  • 1870 Schools were built for children aged 5-10.
  • 1872 The first FA cup final was played.
  • 1876 The telephone was invented.
  • 1881 The first home with electric lights is built.
  • 1901 Queen Victoria died.

Timelines help us to understand when things happened in history.

Task: Draw a timeline of the Victorian era using the template below and choose at least 5 events that you found interesting from the list above and write them on your timeline in time order. You could draw pictures next to each event as well. You could also research more events here. Remember to include what happened in 1837 and 1901.

The Victorians – Beside the Seaside

Last week we learnt about what school was like in Victorian times. This week we will learn about where Victorians went on holiday. The airplane was not invented until after the Victorian era so most people went on holiday by train (as there weren’t many cars either!) to the seaside in Britain.

Reading

We are going to start off by reading a little about how holidays at ‘The Seaside’ began. Carefully read through this and check with an adult or an older sibling if you are unsure of what any of the words mean.

Comparing seasides then and now

Watch two clips about Victorian seasides and then compare how they are the same and different to now.

 As you watch the clips imagine that you are there. How do you feel? What can you see/hear What are you eating? What are you wearing?

Click here to watch the first clip and here to watch the second clip.

Task: What is the same and different about going to the seaside then and now? Look at these pictures and complete the diagram.

Writing

Write a story about a child going to the seaside for the day with their family or on a school trip. How old is the child? Do they work or go to school? Does the child have siblings? What are their parents like? Have they been to the seaside before?

The purpose of stories are to entertain readers. Therefore they must have a beginning, build up of excitement, a problem and a solution and ending.

What problem will happen at the beach? How will it be solved? Will someone get lost? Will someone lose something? Will it rain?

Use a story mountain or a story board to plan your story. Use key words and pictures.

To be successful you must include the following in your story:

  • 3rd person (he, she, they)
  • past tense
  • Introduction describing the character, where they are, what they’re doing
  • Build up of excitement
  • A problem
  • How the problem is solved
  • An ending
  • Describe what you see, hear, smell, feel, taste using adjectives
  • Feelings

Challenge: can you use exclamation sentences to add excitement and feeling?

Here is a lesson on writing descriptive sentences. Here is a short lesson and activities on using exclamation marks and here is a recap lesson on using full-stops, capital letters and joining words.

Please encourage children to use the think it, say it, write it, CHECK IT method for every sentence when writing and then ensure they read through their work at the end to correct any punctuation and spelling errors and see what they can add to make it even better!

Spellings

replacing a letter with an apostrophe:

  1. cannot = can’t
  2. did not = didn’t
  3. has not = hasn’t
  4. could not = couldn’t
  5. it is = it’s
  6. I will = I’ll
  7. do not = don’t
  8. was not = wasn’t
  9. must not = mustn’t
  10. were not = weren’t

Maths

Recap: Last week you explored length and height. What does cm stand for? What does m stand for? Can you tell me what is longer 3m or 200cm? Explain how you know.

This week we are focusing on capacity and volume. Watch these entertaining videos to learn what capacity and volume is.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/teach/class-clips-video/maths-ks1-measurements-titch-and-ted-do-maths-part-four/zhqrkmn

Once you have watched the videos you then have 10 online lessons to complete on capacity and volume: https://www.thenational.academy/online-classroom/year-2/maths#subjects

If you get stuck you could watch these short clips to help you: https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zt9k7ty/resources/1

Complete the measurement tasks on Mathletics, include the challenges ‘Cube faces’ and ‘Placing Pumpkins.’

Computing

The internet is great and going on our tablets and computers can help us learn lots and have lots of fun. However, spending too long sat on the internet and staring at a screen – whatever we’re doing – is not good for us.

Task: Can you spot the signs that you have been on your computer, tablet or phone for too long? Create a table like the one below and spot the signs from the world around you and from your body. You could draw pictures to help you remember.

Here are some more signs. Are they from the world around you or your body?

Task: What can you do to stop each of these things happening? Match the problems and solutions below or think of your own solutions to the signs you have noticed.

Check out RaspberryPi’s weekly computing challenges here. They also have a live lesson every Wednesday at 2pm!

Hour of Code also have loads of coding activities here.

Parents and carers, for more about keeping your child safe online click here. Click here for a guide on how to create a family agreement to set expectations and boundaries about internet use at home.

PSHE

The aim of this lesson is to understand that sometimes it is good to keep a secret and sometimes it is not and to know who to talk to when you have been told to keep a secret you do not want to keep.

Here is a surprise present for your friend’s birthday. Your parent told you what the present is! Why is it a good secret to keep? How would your friend feel if you told them the surprise present before they opened it?

Have you ever had to keep a good secret? (like a present, or surprise event or treat for someone) How did it feel keeping the secret? How did the person feel when they got the surprise? Has someone ever kept a good secret from you?

Good secrets might make us feel happy or excited and often lead to surprises that make other people feel good.

However, sometimes there are ‘worry’ secrets that make us feel sad or worried. Here are some examples of worry secrets. Discuss with an adult what you should do for each secret.

You must tell an adult you trust about worry secrets. Usually, if we do not tell a worry secret we will feel bad or our worry might get worse and something bad could happen. If we tell an adult we trust then this will make things better.

  • Why is it important to tell an adult?
  • Who should you tell?
  • Why is it sometimes difficult to tell worry secrets?

Now on your own decide on one adult that you trust, or even a list of adults you trust, that you will tell any worry secrets to.